Talk:Computer accessibility

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Untitled[edit]

Why was the following recently removed from the article?

"The Cascading Style Sheets system has been devised with this in mind, since it gives the reader full control over the appearance of the page.
"As an example, most web browsers have an option to ignore the font size specified in a webpage, so that the user can circumvent a small font forced upon him or her by a webpage author. However, sometimes a webpage author fails to take into account that users may want to apply such an option and designs a webpage such that applying this option gives poor results, such as too small a distance between lines, disabled scrolling even though texts do not fit in assigned spaces, overlapping texts, etc."

-- Jmabel 06:03, Jul 15, 2004 (UTC)

That surprised me too, I restored it.--Patrick 10:31, 15 Jul 2004 (UTC)

Wikipedia:WikiProject Usability[edit]

I've recently created a Usability WikiProject. The intent is to make Wikipedia easier and more pleasant to use by encouraging things like accessibility, Cross-browser support, standardized templates, and so on. If anyone's interested, please have a look at it, and see if perhaps you'd like to join. –MT 29 June 2005 03:09 (UTC)


Medical and Social models of disability[edit]

I've cut the following from the article because it is (slightly) off-topic and certainly uncited. I suspect that similar material could be appropriately sourced and placed in a different Wikipedia article, possibly one that would be linked from this one, but there is nothing in this that has to do with computer accessibility, the topic of this article. -- Jmabel | Talk 01:22, 8 December 2005 (UTC)

[Begin cut material]
Medical and Social models of disability

The medical model of disabled people is determined by medical professionals and non disabled people. Most people see disabled people as people with a medical problem that need curing if possible. The main idea is that disabled peoples lives are restricted by there impairment in such a way they need a medical professional in there lives to help them. The social model of disability however is created by disabled people themselves. It describes a disability not as a medical issue, but as one where they face daily barriers in society. People influenced by the medical model see disabled people as needing medical treatment; if they cannot be cured then they should be cared for by society, normally in a residential institution or hospital. This way of thinking is severely criticised of disempowering disabled people, medical professionals are assigned to decide for them whether they live, die, have treatment or not, where and how they live there lives. This ideology is embraced by most societies and shows the way people think about disabled people and how we fail to grant them proper access to education, leisure, work and relationships.

In the social model the barriers are suggested to be caused by non disabled people, such as the way some buildings, towns, public tools are designed and built, the way social activities are organised and in the attitudes the some people perpetuate. People who are influenced by the social model think people face discrimination daily. The skills and attributes are overlooked and their potential is determined by the prejudice views of people who believe in the medical model and are excluded by society. The social model identified barriers, behaviours and attitudes that cause problems for disabled people. Helping them recognise and overcome the barriers they face empowers disabled people. [End cut material]

A11y redirection?[edit]

A11y redirects to this page, but in this page doesn't explain what A11y is or what it does. In fact, it doesn't even mention the word "A11y", and actually using google to research it is just as futile. If anyone knows what A11y is, PLEASE put it in! (a5y 20:58, 13 March 2006 (UTC))

I'd suggest that you ask User:Cmdrjameson, who made the link and who is (according to his user page) a computer science student. - Jmabel | Talk 18:30, 19 March 2006 (UTC)
Added (it's an n-omitted abbreviation, like i18n and l10n). -- EdC 22:19, 18 May 2006 (UTC)

External links[edit]

I'm seeking others' opinions on the appropriateness of the recently added Nomensa link. The articles there are apropos, but it's definitely a commercial site. I can go either way, hence the question. - Jmabel | Talk 04:30, 29 March 2006 (UTC)

Ditto for Abilitynet. It looks specific to UK, and it's clearly a business. Is there enough useful material on the web site to merit this link to a company that does assessments professionally? - Jmabel | Talk 21:49, 5 October 2006 (UTC)

This note was left on my user talk page.

Hi Jmabel. In relation to comment about the AbilityNet link (it being a business). AbilityNet is a charity and is also a registered company. As a charity, they provide free services to the disabled when appropriate. As a registered company, they charge for professional services when appropriate - in order to fund the free services. They are regulated by the charity commission just like any other charity. They also get donation funding. AbilityNet is similar to organisations like the RNIB, only serving a wider audience. Please don't misinterpret what I have written here. I'm merely trying to explain the relevance of the link. Regards. Abilitynet 09:55, 6 October 2006 (UTC)

Assuming that's accurate, that sounds reasonable. - Jmabel | Talk 15:50, 6 October 2006 (UTC)

"Impairment"[edit]

What is with all this "impairment" language that has come into the article? Most Deaf people I've known would consider the term "hearing impaired" insulting and condescending. And the linking [[Hearing impairment|deafness]] is an extreme case of this. - Jmabel | Talk 07:12, 21 September 2006 (UTC)

I guess they've used "impaired", becuase this may refer not only to completely deaf people, but to people with limited hearing too. Of course, "deaf" sounds more natural than "hearing impaired". --Cameltrader 08:15, 21 September 2006 (UTC)

"Deaf" and "hearing impaired" are two different things. A "hearing impaired" person is just that: one with a limited ability to hear. A "deaf" person cannot hear (although a person may be counted as deaf even though they have just enough hearing to detect, for example, explosions). [[Hearing impairment|deafness]] is just plain wrong. - Jmabel | Talk 21:30, 23 September 2006 (UTC) this is a inportaint thing to remember —Preceding unsigned comment added by 72.10.212.102 (talk) 20:27, 10 May 2010 (UTC)

It's not just a software concern[edit]

It can be as much about hardware as software, even setting aside assistive technologies. For example, processor noise can make computers inaccessible for users with hyperacusis and/or auditory sensory defensiveness. 173.66.211.53 (talk) 03:05, 15 May 2013 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

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External links modified[edit]

Hello fellow Wikipedians,

I have just modified one external link on Computer accessibility. Please take a moment to review my edit. If you have any questions, or need the bot to ignore the links, or the page altogether, please visit this simple FaQ for additional information. I made the following changes:

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General/Grammar Edits[edit]

Hi everyone! I will be going through the entire article and do grammar edits as well as general edits. This includes fixing grammar mistakes, as well as making the format of the page more concise and easy to understand. --VarshaKal (talk) 00:38, 22 November 2019 (UTC)