Talk:Stress (biology)

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Former featured article candidateStress (biology) is a former featured article candidate. Please view the links under Article milestones below to see why the nomination failed. For older candidates, please check the archive.
Article milestones
DateProcessResult
December 24, 2011Featured article candidateNot promoted

Wiki Education assignment: Mind-Body, section 18[edit]

This article was the subject of a Wiki Education Foundation-supported course assignment, between 22 August 2022 and 10 December 2022. Further details are available on the course page. Student editor(s): Lucaslanni521, M2181581, Katiestano (article contribs). Peer reviewers: Reagy64, Ffaa88, Alexb888, Tim1113, Sohanigohal.

— Assignment last updated by Tim1113 (talk) 17:41, 28 October 2022 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Wiki Education assignment: Mind-Body, section 16[edit]

This article was the subject of a Wiki Education Foundation-supported course assignment, between 22 August 2022 and 14 December 2022. Further details are available on the course page. Student editor(s): Amelia Marcellus, Jade.yacoub, Mfino23, Briannageo5, Jovanna.lanbaxter (article contribs). Peer reviewers: JG1881, CA1881.

— Assignment last updated by Jovanna.lanbaxter (talk) 17:34, 25 December 2022 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Wiki Education assignment: General Biology I Honors[edit]

This article was the subject of a Wiki Education Foundation-supported course assignment, between 31 August 2022 and 16 December 2022. Further details are available on the course page. Student editor(s): Jand1990 (article contribs). Peer reviewers: SandersKathryn, Anoshah04, Avengers2015, Kkio77.

— Assignment last updated by Sprygrocki (talk) 19:23, 19 November 2022 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Circular definition of stress[edit]

First statement defines stress in terms of a Stressor. Then, the linked article about Stressor defines it in terms of stress. That is a totally circular definition and doesn't really help me to understand what stress is. 109.183.181.224 (talk) 12:10, 30 October 2022 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Requesting admin to clean up[edit]

Under "Biological Need for Equilibrium" heading: "The brain cannot sustain a concentrated equilibrium under chronic stress, overtime if you constantly struggle in a simmering sea of stress, and you body budget accrued an ever-deepening deficit, that's called chronic stress and it does more than just make you miserable in that moment, It can and will gradually eat away at your brain and cause illness in your body. " I do not believe this is supported by the citation. If it is, could we clean up the sentence structure and use a neutral point of view? Brain atrophy is already discussed under the "Psychology" heading.

Under "Development" heading: "Chronic stress also has a lot of illnesses and health care problems other than mental that comes with it. Severe chronic stress for long periods of time can lead to an increased chance of catching illnesses such as diabetes, cancer, depression, heart disease and Alzheimer's disease." This is attributed to the same source as above. Unclear if supported. If it is, can we clean up language? Chronic stress is associated with other illnesses and health care burdens? Diabetes, cancer, depression, heart disease and Alzheimer's disease are not typically "caught".

Under "History in research" heading: "By the 1990s, "stress" had become an integral part of modern scientific understanding in all areas of physiology and human functioning, and one of the great metaphors of Western life. Focus grew on stress in certain settings, such as workplace stress, and stress management techniques were developed. The term also became a euphemism, a way of referring to problems and eliciting sympathy without being explicitly confessional, just "stressed out". It came to cover a huge range of phenomena from mild irritation to the kind of severe problems that might result in a real breakdown of health. In popular usage, almost any event or situation between these extremes could be described as stressful. During this time society spent less attention to the actual danger and severeness to mental health, this society might not have cared about those consequences of what we say or do. We might not agree that those consequences of being harsh to another individual verbally is to be considered abuse but they nonetheless have costs that we all pay." Again attributed to same source but unclear if supported. Unclear how "metaphor for Western life" is supported? Last few sentences don't make sense? POV changes to first person? 47.55.88.81 (talk) 21:47, 2 June 2023 (UTC)Reply[reply]